15 Best AM/FM Radio Headphones In 2019

Looking for the best AM/FM radio headphones on the market? Our article on 15 best AM/FM radio headphones is here to help you make the right choice. We will discuss the reasons to buy radio headphones, talk about their characteristics, discuss different types of radio headphones, and give you our selection of 15 best AM/FM radio headphones.


Radio broadcasting is maybe an old and a bit forgotten technology but it’s still alive and there are so many enthusiasts and old-schoolers all over the world who enjoy listening to the radio. There are quite a few questions that come to mind when thinking about buying radio headphones – why would you buy radio headphones when you can buy a regular radio with better reception, what kind of radio headphones to buy, do you need both AM and FM tuners, etc. So, let’s give you some answers.

AM/FM Radio Headphones VS Regular AM/FM Radio

Well, if you’re looking for the best possible reception/sensitivity, those regular AM/FM radios are probably the better option. The thing is – AM/FM radio headphones usually have small antennas (internal or external) while the old-school radios have much larger external antennas. AM/FM radio headphones don’t necessarily have poor reception but the radios are, in most cases, better.

On the other hand, radio headphones are much more convenient. So, if you don’t want to skip a word of your favorite show or some weather/traffic report, radio headphones are a much better choice. Also, if you want something to help you with ambient noise attenuation, some AM/FM radio headphones might be the thing you need. There’s a variety of noise reduction headphones with AM/FM tuners and they are much more fun than regular noise reduction headphones without any additional features. So, if you need noise reduction headphones for lawn mowing or if you are constantly exposed to loud noises, buying a pair of noise reduction radio headphones is a viable option.

Types of AM/FM Radio Headphones

Radio headphones can be roughly divided into three groups – noise reduction radio headphones, Bluetooth headphones with AM or FM tuners, and so-called regular AM/FM radio headphones.

AM/FM Radio Headphones

Regular AM/FM radio headphones are the least popular group. These headphones are designed for radio listening only. They usually don’t have any input ports and don’t have any additional features. Also, there are only a few models available (Sony SRFH2, Sony SRFH4, Sony SRFHM55).

There are numerous regular Bluetooth headphones with built-in AM and FM tuners (usually only FM tuners). This group is much larger than the first one. However, all these headphones are primarily Bluetooth headphones and built-in FM tuners are just an additional feature that improves their versatility. These FM tuners are not always great but they will allow you to listen to the stations with the best coverage.



The third, and probably, the largest group are noise reduction AM/FM radio headphones. Their primary purpose is to protect your hearing but they also have built-in AM and FM tuners. In some cases, they also have some additional connections (AUX inputs or Bluetooth). This is also the most popular group of AM/FM radio headphones and the majority of headphones on our list are, in fact, noise reduction AM/FM radio headphones.

Best AM/FM Radio Headphones – Comparison Table

AM/FM Radio HeadphonesRatingPriceReview
3M WorkTunes 90541-80025T4.4Check PriceRead Review
Howard Leight by Honeywell4.2Check PriceRead Review
3M WorkTunes4.1Check PriceRead Review
Stanley Sync4.0Check PriceRead Review
Protear3.8Check PriceRead Review
3M Peltor4.1Check PriceRead Review
Dewalt DPG153.7Check PriceRead Review
Retekess TR1013.8Check PriceRead Review
Zohan TYPE-A3.7Check PriceRead Review
Elvex COM-6603.6Check PriceRead Review
ION Audio Tough Sounds3.4Check PriceRead Review
PowerLocus4.3Check PriceRead Review
Bluedio T2 Plus Turbine3.8Check PriceRead Review
NIA Q84.3Check PriceRead Review
Elegiant3.9Check PriceRead Review

When you click on “Check Price” you will be redirected to Amazon.


The Importance of Noise Reduction and The Meaning of NRR

If you are constantly exposed to very loud noises, buying noise reduction headphones is highly recommended. If you are a construction/industrial worker or if you are visiting some extremely loud event, having noise reduction headphones could help you save your hearing. When buying those noise reduction headphones, you should check if they have AM and FM tuners but, more importantly, you should check their NRR (noise reduction rating). NRR describes the potential of noise reduction headphones to attenuate noise. The highest possible NRR for earmuffs is 30dB. 



Now that you know some basic things about AM/FM radio headphones, we can move onto our selection of 15 best AM/FM radio headphones. The list is divided into two parts – best hearing protection AM/FM radio headphones and best Bluetooth headphones with AM/FM tuners.


Best Hearing Protection AM/FM Radio Headphones 

1. 3M WorkTunes Wired Connect Hearing Protector with AM/FM Tuner

3M WorkTunes Wired Connect Hearing Protector with AM/FM Tuner

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3M is a well-known manufacturer of all kinds of safety equipment (equipment for personal protection, for cleaning, for healthcare, etc.). Their noise reduction headphones are probably the most popular choice when it comes to hearing protection equipment. Their headphones are quite affordable and offer great value for the price. 3M Worktunes Wired AM/FM radio headphones are our top choice under $40. The biggest upsides are great hearing protection, very good FM reception, and decent sound quality (considering the price). The only downside we can think of is the lack of Bluetooth connectivity. 

What’s in the box?

3M Worktunes wired headphones come in simple packaging along with a thin 3.5mm audio cable, user manual, and a warranty card.

Things we like 

We can’t say that we were impressed by the looks but that’s pretty much the standard design of hearing protection headphones with bulky earcups, reinforced headband frame, and large buttons and dials. The comfort is satisfying. The headband is adjustable and the paddings are thick. The earpads are not extremely soft but they seal nicely around your ears. 

The noise reduction is rated at 24dB. They are not the most capable headphones when it comes to noise attenuation, but 24dB is more than enough to make lawn mowing more tolerable.

The controls are easily reachable and gloves-friendly. On one cup, there’s just a battery compartment. The other cup houses volume/power dial, tuning dial, and two large buttons (AM/FM and MODE button). On top of the cup, there’s a rubberized external antenna. AM/FM button allows you to shift between two radio modes. MODE button allows you to adjust the bass response (you can select one of two bass-boost modes). You can rotate the tuning dial to select the station manually or you can press it to scan stations automatically. Voice assistant will tell you the station frequency and it will tell you the battery status.

AM and FM signal receptions are surprisingly good, especially considering the price. The headphones were able to find more than 25 FM stations and 10 relatively clear AM stations.

The headphones use two AA batteries and can provide up to 50 hours of playtime in radio mode. When used in wired mode (connected to your phone or some other device via 3.5mm audio cable), you don’t need any batteries. 

The sound is better than the price implies. There’s subtle midrange emphasis with nicely balanced lows and highs. If you prefer bassier sound, you can boost the bass by pressing the MODE button. 

Things we don’t like

The headphones don’t feature Bluetooth connectivity but that’s not a huge downside at this price point. If you really need Bluetooth connectivity, there’s a Bluetooth-enabled version of these headphones but it’s a little bit pricier.

Another thing we’ve noticed are those exposed wires connecting the cups. The wires are thick, rubberized, and feel durable but they are still exposed.


Comparison Table


2. Howard Leight by Honeywell Sync Hi-Visibility Digital AM/FM Radio Earmuff

Howard Leight by Honeywell Sync Hi-Visibility Digital AM/FM Radio Earmuff

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Honeywell is another reputable safety equipment manufacturer. Honeywell’s Howard Leight hearing protection headphones could easily be one of the best options under $60. In many ways, they are very similar to previously reviewed 3M Worktunes wired headphones but there’re a few simple upgrades like the high-visibility cups, reflective headband, and digital tuning with a simple LCD screen. Just like 3M Worktunes headphones, Howard Leight headphones/earmuffs don’t feature Bluetooth connectivity. 

What’s in the box?

Inside a simple packaging, you’ll find your Howard Leight headphones, auxiliary audio cable, 2 AA batteries, a short manual, and a warranty card.

Things we like 

The headphones look and feel quite solid. Thick plastic was used for the cups. The headband frame is made of steel. The paddings are thick and soft. There’s nice stitching along the headband edges. The stitching color matches the color of the cups (neon green/yellow). There’s some branding on top of the headband. 

The control scheme is simple. There are four buttons on the cover of the right cup (two tuning buttons, power button, and mode (AM/FM) selector). Right above the buttons, there’s a small LCD that shows the frequency. The right cup also houses thick external antenna, volume dial, and a 3.5mm audio input. The battery compartment is located inside the left cup. The headphones use 2 AA batteries.

The headphones offer a good balance between comfort and noise isolation. They are maybe a little bit tighter but they seal perfectly around your ears and can attenuate the ambient noise by up to 25dB. 

When used in AM/FM mode, the headphones require batteries. According to the manufacturer, one set of batteries will provide up to 140 hours of playtime. In reality, you will get up to 100h at 50-60% volume.

AM and FM signal receptions are very good. In AM mode, the headphones can find at least 10 perfectly clear AM stations. The results are much better in FM mode. It’s possible to save up to 10 presets.

When used in wired mode (connected to your phone or mp3 player), the batteries are not required.  

The sound quality is satisfying, considering the price. The midrange is articulate and perfectly clear. The emphasis is on the vocals. The bass response is relatively flat and the highs are a bit too bright. 

Things we don’t like

Howard Leight headphones are not Bluetooth-enabled which is, at this price point, just a minor downside. Also, there are two small pieces of wire connecting the cups that are exposed. They are very thick and durable but they are still exposed. 

Comparison Table


3. 3M WorkTunes Bluetooth Hearing Protector with AM/FM Tuner

3M WorkTunes Bluetooth Hearing Protector with AM/FM Tuner

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3M Worktunes Bluetooth hearing protection headphones are the upgraded version of the previously reviewed 3M Worktunes Wired Connect. Compared to the first version, the wireless version features Bluetooth connectivity, different headband style, and different kind of tuning dial. The best thing is that these are only $15 pricier than the wired version. 

What’s in the box?

Inside the box, you will find your 3M WorkTunes wireless headphones, 3.5mm audio cable, 2 AA batteries, a short manual, and a warranty card. The headphones can work on Li-ion rechargeable battery but the battery is not included in the package and you have to buy it separately. The same goes for the hard-shell carrying case.

Things we like

In terms of design and build quality, these are pretty similar to the wired version. They are quite sturdy and rugged with strong plastic cups and steel headband frame. Unlike the wired version, this one has vented silicone headband (not padded) and this is supposed to improve the overall comfort. The earpads are thick but not very soft. The clamping force is a little bit stronger and could cause some discomfort and ear-sweating but that’s the price you have to pay if you want good noise isolation. Like the wired version, 3M WorkTunes wireless headphones can attenuate up to 24dB of ambient noise. 

The control scheme is also similar. On the right cup, you have redesigned rotary tuning dial and volume/power dial. Tuning dial can also be used for pausing the playback and going backward/forward in Bluetooth and AUX modes. On the earcup cover, there are two buttons – source and function. The function button is used to shift between AM and FM, initiate pairing, and memorize stations. The left cup houses the battery compartment. You need either 2 AA batteries or one 3M ALPHA1100 Li-ion battery. 

In wireless mode, you can use the headphones to listen to AM/FM radio or to listen to any audio content via Bluetooth. AM/FM reception is more than satisfying. You can memorize up to 50 radio presets. Bluetooth connection offers satisfying performance with a standard 30ft range. The playtime is different in Bluetooth and AM/FM mode. In Bluetooth mode, you will get up to 20h of playtime with two AA batteries (50% volume). In AM/FM mode, you’ll get up to 60 hours. When there’s no music for 2 hours, the headphones will turn off automatically. 

When you run out of juice, you can use the headphones in wired mode, which doesn’t require battery and has a priority over the wireless connection. Wired mode activates the moment you attach the cable. 

The sound quality is very much on par with the price. You have a subtle midrange emphasis with nice bass and relatively consistent high-end reproduction. Instead of the bass boost modes you’ve had on the wired version, there are three EQ presets (pop, rock, flat) that you can activate by holding the source button. The headphones have a volume-limiting feature called safe volume control. This feature will allow you to increase the volume but it will monitor the period of exposure and it will gradually reduce the volume if necessary.

Things we don’t like

You can’t answer calls in Bluetooth and wired modes. The upgraded version with a built-in mic is supposed to hit the market soon. Also, some people may not like the safe volume control.

Comparison Table


4. Stanley Sync Digital AM/FM/MP3 Radio Earmuffs 

Stanley Sync Digital AM/FM/MP3 Radio Earmuffs

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Remember Howard Leight by Honeywell? Well, these are basically the same thing. They share the same design with a 4-button control scheme, an LCD screen, the same external radio antenna, and the same removable pads. The only difference is the lack of reflective headband. 

What’s in the box?

The packaging contains your Stanley Sync headphones, 3.5mm audio cable, 2 AA batteries, manual, and a warranty card. 

Things we like 

The headphones are light but sturdy and durable. The cups are plastic and the headband frame is made of steel. The ear cups have a relatively slim profile (compared to other hearing protection headphones). The headband is nicely padded and soft. The earpads are not incredibly thick but they provide a satisfying amount of comfort and they seal nicely around ears. Also, the cushions are easily replaceable. The NRR is estimated at 25dB (the headphones can attenuate up to 25dB of ambient noise).

The control scheme is fairly easy to use. You should be able to master the controls in just a few hours. The left cup houses only battery compartment (2 AA batteries needed). All the controls and inputs are on the right cup. On the earcup cover, you have two tuning buttons, power/AM/FM button, and mode/memory button (used to save or select the radio preset). Right above the buttons, there’s an LCD screen (shows the mode and frequency). On the bottom, there are the volume dial and AUX input. The right cup also houses a rubberized external antenna.

When used for listening to the radio, the headphones are completely wireless. Two AA batteries can provide up to 60 hours of playtime which is more than satisfying. AM and FM signal receptions and sensitivities are very good. You can memorize up to 10 stations.

If you run out of battery, you can use them in wired mode. You just have to connect them to your phone or some other audio source.

The sonic performance is not going to blow you away. After all, these are noise reduction radio headphones. The mids are nice and clear, the bass is present and punchy, and the highs are a bit too bright. 

Things we don’t like

One thing you may not like is the volume limit at 82dB. Some people find this too quiet.  Also, these headphones are not Bluetooth-enabled.

Comparison Table


5. PROTEAR Bluetooth AM/FM Radio Headphones

PROTEAR Bluetooth AM/FM Radio Headphones

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PROTEAR is a Chinese generic brand. In spite of the common opinion that generic brands are usually bad, these headphones actually deserve your attention. They offer pretty good noise attenuation, they are Bluetooth-enabled, and they have a built-in mic. 

What’s in the box?

Inside a simple package, you’ll find your PROTEAR headphones, USB charging cable, carrying case, manual, and a warranty card. These headphones use rechargeable Li-ion battery and the battery is included in the package. 

Things we like

In terms of design and build, PROTEAR headphones are very similar to some of the previously reviewed headphones. They are sturdy enough to withstand all the rigors of everyday use but not crazy rugged. The cups are made of dense plastic and the headband frame is made of steel. 

The control scheme is also similar to the scheme we’ve seen in the previous two models. The button arrangement is changed but you still have 4 buttons – two tuning buttons (UP and DOWN), MODE button, and preset button. Tuning buttons can be used to search for stations or to play the next/previous song. Right above the control buttons, there’s an LCD screen which shows the clock, input, or the frequency. On the bottom of the right cup, you have the volume dial and 3.5mm audio input. The right cup also houses thick and rubberized radio antenna. The battery compartment is located on the left cup.

The comfort is not problematic as long as you can live with a little bit tighter fit.  The cushioning is thick and comfy. NRR is estimated at 25dB.

The headphones are completely wireless in Bluetooth or AM/FM mode. In Bluetooth mode, you’ll get less than 10 hours of playtime at 50% volume. In AM/FM mode, you will get up to 25 hours. AM/FM reception is on par with previously mentioned 3M WorkTunes, Honeywell, and Stanley headphones. However, you’ll be able to save only 8 presets. Bluetooth connection offers average performance with a reliable transmission within the 20ft range. In Bluetooth mode, you can use the headphones to answer calls. The call quality is not perfect but the mic is still usable and can come in handy in certain situations. If you run out of battery, you can always plug in the AUX cable and use the headphones in wired mode.

We are not impressed by the sound quality. Like many other AM/FM radio headphones, PROTEAR headphones have a volume-limiting feature. The vocals are clear but the bass is suppressed and tiny.

Things we don’t like

The built-in microphone can only be used in Bluetooth mode – you can’t use it when your PROTEAR headphones are connected to your phone via AUX cable. 

The number of presets is not on par with other similar AM/FM radio headphones.

Comparison Table


6. 3M PELTOR WorkTunes AM/FM Radio Headset

3M PELTOR WorkTunes AM/FM Radio Headset

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3M PELTOR WorkTunes is a redesigned version of the first 3M WorkTunes headphones on this list. The PELTOR headphones have black cups while the previous version had yellow cups. Also, the antenna is internal (not external), the headband has a different kind of padding, and the button layout is modified (a bit less intuitive). The biggest advantage of PELTOR headphones over the original 3M WorkTunes headphones is better noise reduction (26dB VS 24dB). 

What’s in the box?

Inside a simple packaging, you’ll find your PELTOR headphones, two AA batteries, detachable auxiliary cable, manual, and a warranty card. The carrying case is sold separately. 

Things we like 

When it comes to design, there’re some similarities with the original model, like the shape and size of the cups, the material they are made of, and steel headband frame. However, the cups are entirely black, without yellow details and the headband has a different type of padding. It’s thinner and it’s more helmet-friendly but it’s not the same kind of vented headband we’ve seen on the Bluetooth version of 3M WorkTunes headphones. 

The build quality is, as expected, very good. The headphones can definitely withstand a few accidental drops and kicks. When it comes to comfort, PELTOR headphones are a little bit lighter than the first 3M WorkTunes headphones but the clamping force is still very strong and could cause some discomfort after a few hours of use. The noise reduction potential of PELTOR headphones is slightly better (compared to the first two 3M WorkTunes headphones on the list). NRR is estimated at 26dB. 

The control scheme is modified. You have only three buttons (+/- and power button) and you are supposed to use them to tune stations, control playback, save presets, and control volume. The previous two versions had more intuitive control schemes. You will need a little bit more time to get used to these controls. 

You can use the headphones as wireless when listening to the radio (AM or FM mode). The batteries can deliver 35-40 hours at 50% volume. The headphones have auto-off feature – they will shut down after 4 hours of inactivity.

When you run out of battery, you can always connect the headphones to your phone via AUX cable and keep listening to music. 

The AM reception is a little bit worse compared to the 3M WorkTunes headphones with external antennas. We haven’t noticed any difference when it comes to FM reception. 

PELTOR headphones offer a bit better sonic performance. The bass is punchier and more impactful but doesn’t affect the mids and vocals, which are the biggest highlight. The treble is relatively consistent.

Things we don’t like

PELTOR headphones are pricier than the Bluetooth version of 3M WorkTunes headphones but aren’t Bluetooth-enabled. If you want a pair of headphones with Bluetooth connectivity, this is not the model for you. 

PELTOR headphones can memorize only 5 presets. The previous two 3M WorkTunes headphone models were able to memorize up to 50 presets.

Comparison Table


7. DEWALT DPG15 Industrial Safety Electronic Hearing Muff

DEWALT DPG15 Industrial Safety Electronic Hearing Muff

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DEWALT is another popular manufacturer of power tools and safety equipment (including hearing protection headphones). DPG15 is their most popular hearing protection model and it’s very similar to some previously mentioned non-Bluetooth hearing protection headphones. 

What’s in the box?

The packaging contains your headphones, auxiliary audio cable, two AA batteries, manual, and a warranty card. The carrying case is not included.

Things we like 

Well, there’s nothing new or unusual when it comes to design and build of DPG15. They are very similar to all the previous hearing protection headphones. You have the same bulky cups, steel headband frame, thick headband padding, and slightly less thick earpads. Like all the previous models, DPG15 is a bit tighter (in order to provide better noise attenuation). NRR is estimated at 25dB.

The battery compartment is located on the left cup and all the controls are on the right cup. You have four buttons and the layout is simple. There are two tuning buttons, the preset button, and the AM/FM button. Above the buttons, you have a simple LCD display with some basic info (mode and frequency). On the bottom, there are AUX input and power/volume dial. The right cup also houses an external antenna. 

You have two modes – wireless (AM/FM) and wired (AUX). You are going to need the batteries in wireless mode and one pair of AA batteries will deliver up to 20 hours of playtime. The batteries are not required in wired mode.

AM/FM reception is satisfying but not exactly on par with the price or with other similar hearing protection headphones. There is simply too much static noise in AM mode on almost every station. The FM reception is much better. You can memorize up to 8 presets. 

Sonic performance is not amazing but, compared to other similar models, it’s pretty much satisfying and the emphasis is on the midrange.

Things we don’t like

At $50 price point, you can find a few models that are Bluetooth-enabled. DPG15 headphones don’t feature Bluetooth. 

There are only 8 presets while some other headphones offer up to 50 presets.

Compared to other similarly priced models, DPG15 headphones deliver shorter playtime.

There have been several complaints regarding the earpad durability but our model looked perfectly fine.

Comparison Table


8. Retekess TR101 Walkman Headphone Radio FM Stereo Headset

Retekess TR101 Walkman Headphone Radio FM Stereo Headset

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Retekess TR101 headphones are in a few ways different from all the previously mentioned headphones. First, they only have the FM tuner. Second, they are primarily designed for radio listening while noise protection is secondary. Third, all the previous models basically look like different versions of the same headphones while these headphones look quite different. Fourth, Retekess TR101 is one of the cheapest models on the market – it’s priced under $20.

What’s in the box?

Inside a very modest packaging, you will find your Retekess headphones, manual, and a warranty card. Batteries and carrying case/pouch are not included.

Things we like 

There’s nothing spectacular regarding the design or the build quality of these headphones. They are entirely made of plastic with two arches connecting the cups instead of a padded headband. The cups are also made of plastic. So, Retekess headphones are definitely not as durable as previous headphones but you can hardly get anything better at this price point.

Retekess headphones are much comfier than all those hearing protection headphones. They are lighter and not as tight. The headband is not padded but that doesn’t affect the overall comfort. Hearing protection is just a secondary purpose of Retekess headphones and it’s not officially rated (no NRR) but they will definitely isolate a certain amount of ambient noise.

The control scheme is quite strange. The left cup houses only battery compartment while there are nine clustered buttons on the right cup. Finding the right button will be really hard at first. Above the buttons, there’s an LCD display showing the frequency.

You can use the headphones in wireless (FM radio) or wired (AUX) mode. In wireless mode, you will get up to 30h of playtime at 50% volume. When you run out of battery, you can always use a standard 3.5mm audio cable (which is not included). 

Sensitivity and reception in FM mode are very good. You can save up to 10 favorite stations. 

Unlike some previous models, these are bassy. They are not extremely heavy on the bass, but still, bassier than others. The mids are clear and the highs are relatively consistent.

Things we don’t like

Since they are cheap, the all-plastic build is completely expected but we still have to point out that Retekess headphones are not very durable.

The Retekess headphones have only FM tuner. There’s no AM tuner. 

Comparison Table


9. ZOHAN TYPE-A AM FM Radio Headphone with Digital Display

ZOHAN TYPE-A AM/FM Radio Headphone with Digital Display

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ZOHAN is just another generic brand. ZOHAN hearing protection headphones are, in many ways, similar to previously mentioned 3M WorkTunes, DEWALT, or Honeywell headphones. The headphones have AM and FM tuners, and they support wired connection. 

What’s in the box?

The box contains your headphones, black carrying pouch, 3.5mm audio cable, manual, and a warranty card. Batteries are not included.

Things we like 

There’s nothing new when it comes to design. ZOHAN headphones are basically a combination of two or three previous headphone models. Like all the hearing protection headphones, they are solid and look durable. Plastic was used for the cups. The headband frame is made of steel. Headband padding doesn’t look very sophisticated but it’s thick and soft. The earpads are not extremely thick but are comfy. The clamping force is stronger than average but not excessive. NRR is estimated at 24dB.

The controls are simple. All the buttons and knobs are on the right cup. You have four buttons (tuning x2, power, and mode button), a small LCD screen, and a volume knob on the bottom. The right cup also houses one 3.5mm audio input and an external antenna. The battery compartment is located on the left cup (two AA batteries are required). 

The headphones are completely wireless in radio mode. You have both AM and FM tuners. AM reception was not so great – there was a lot of static noise. We have no complaints regarding the FM reception. You can save up to 10 presets. Two batteries will provide 20-30 hours of playtime at 50-60% volume. When you run out of battery, you can use the included AUX cable.

Sonic performance is on par with the price. There is nothing extraordinary about it – the mids and vocals are clear and the bass is punchy in wired mode. 

Things we don’t like

ZOHAN headphones are not Bluetooth-enabled. 

Their AM reception is not perfectly clear. 

Some similarly priced headphones offer more than 10 presets (up to 50).

Comparison Table


10. ELVEX COM-660

ELVEX COM-660

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ELVEC COM-660 is one of the rare hearing protection headphone models with analog tuners. They are easy to use, offer very good sensitivity and reception, and they are battery-operated. They are not on par with some previous models when it comes to noise reduction (22dB). 

What’s in the box?

Along with the ELVEX COM-660, you’ll get an AUX cable, manual, and a warranty card. The batteries are not included (two AA batteries required). 

Things we like 

ELVEX COM-660 headphones are similar to all the previous noise reduction headphones but there are a few distinctive details like the burgundy cups, odd-looking headband padding, and lack of buttons. The comfort is more than satisfying. The headphones are light, the headband is adjustable, and the paddings are thick. The clamping force is just perfect. These are one of the comfiest hearing protection headphones on the list but, on the other hand, they have slightly lower noise reduction rating (estimated at 22dB). 

The control scheme is incredibly simple. All the controls are on the right cup. The largest dial is for tuning. Small dial in the left corner is the power/volume dial and the other dial, in the right corner, is the AM/FM switch. The battery compartment is on the left cup.

Like many previous models, the headphones have both AM and FM tuners and can be connected to your phone or mp3 player via AUX cable. Two AA batteries will deliver up to 150 hours of playtime.

Our experience with tuning and AM/FM reception was very good. The sensitivity of the tuners is impressive. The negative thing is that you don’t have presets and you have to search for your favorite stations every time.

Sound quality is pretty much average and there’s nothing extraordinary about it. In wires mode, the emphasis is on the vocal clarity. The bass gets much stronger in wired mode but there’s the volume limit at 82dB and you can’t turn it off.

Things we don’t like

ELVEX COM-660 headphones are not Bluetooth-enabled. 

Some people may find that volume-limiting feature annoying.

Although we were impressed by the AM/FM reception, we have two complaints regarding the radio. First, there’s no way to tell which frequency you’re on. Second, there are no presets. 

Comparison Table


11. ION Audio Tough Sounds Hearing Protection Headphones

ION Audio Tough Sounds Hearing Protection Headphones

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ION Audio is the first audio equipment manufacturer on this list. All the previous headphones come from the manufacturers of safety equipment. ION Audio is better known for its loud party speakers and tailgate speakers but, as you can see, they also make headphones. ION Audio Tough Sounds headphones are incredibly versatile and offer great hearing protection. 

What’s in the box?

Tough Sounds headphones come with a charging cable, 3.5mm audio cable, manual, and a warranty card. The carrying case is not included.

Things we like 

In terms of design and build, there’s nothing special about Tough Sounds headphones. They are entirely black, the cups are plastic and bulky, the headband frame is made of metal, and the paddings are thick and comfy. They are solid and can withstand a few kicks. The only issue when it comes to comfort is the clamping force. People with sensitive ears might even find them too tight or painful. On the other hand, the headphones offer very good noise attenuation. NRR is 25dB. 

The controls are super-simple and, as many times before, they are all located on the right cup. You have a simple LCD screen in the middle, two buttons above the display (tuning buttons) and two buttons below the display (play/pause/call and source button). On the bottom of the right cup, there are volume dial and an AUX input. On the bottom of the left cup, there’s just a micro USB charging port. 

ION Audio Tough Sounds headphones are one of the most versatile headphone models on this list. They feature AM and FM tuners, Bluetooth connectivity, and AUX port. 

The headphones have a built-in rechargeable battery. According to the specs, the battery is supposed to deliver up to 20 hours of playtime. In reality, you will get 6h max in Bluetooth mode and a little bit more in AM/FM mode. 

Bluetooth works as advertised. The connection is reliable and the range is 30ft. AM and FM receptions are above average. You can also save up to 20 presets. When you run out of juice, you can always use the wired connection (batteries are not required in AUX mode). 

Compared to similarly priced regular Bluetooth headphones, ION Audio Tough Sounds headphones offer pretty much average (or slightly below-average) performance but, compared to other hearing protection headphones, these are pretty good. The bass is present but not crazy deep, the mids are mostly clear, and the treble is bright.

Things we don’t like

Our only complaint is related to battery performance. The advertised playtime is significantly shorter than the actual playtime. 

Comparison Table


Best Bluetooth Headphones with AM/FM Tuners

12. PowerLocus Bluetooth Headphones

PowerLocus Bluetooth Headphones

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PowerLocus is a very interesting, versatile, and very affordable pair of Bluetooth headphones with a built-in FM tuner. The biggest downsides are all-plastic build and lack of AM tuner. 

What’s in the box?

The box contains your PowerLocus headphones, hard-shell carrying case, micro USB charging cable, AUX cable, manual, and a warranty card.

Things we like 

PowerLocus Bluetooth headphones look quite stylish. It’s not the most unique design but it’s still visually appealing. They are kind of sporty but also stylish. According to the specs, these are over-ear headphones but they are more on-ear (the earpads are relatively small). There are so many available colors. 

The build quality is on par with the price. As expected, everything is made of plastic, including the headband frame. They don’t look extremely fragile or too flimsy but they are still made of plastic.  

Comfort is satisfying unless you have a large head. These are simply too small for people with large heads. The clamping force is optimal (for an average head size). They are perfectly stable and the earpads are nice and soft. The headband padding is not very thick but the weight is evenly distributed. Also, the headphones are very light.

All the control buttons and inputs are on the right cup. On the bottom, you have AUX input, micro USB charging port, and micro SD card slot. At the back, there are four buttons – play/pause/call, two volume buttons, and mode button.  The power button is located on the right earcup cover. 

The headphones are quite versatile. You can use them as wireless in Bluetooth, FM, and micro SD card mode. When you run out of juice, you can use them in AUX mode.

Bluetooth connection works flawlessly. The headphones feature Bluetooth 5.0 with a standard 30ft range. The pairing is fast and painless and the connection is stable. NFC pairing and multipoint pairing are not supported. 

FM reception is very good but the bad thing is that you can’t save the presets and you have to search for your favorite stations every time you turn them on.

The built-in battery delivers up to 15 hours of playtime at 50% volume. The recharge takes approx. two hours.

The built-in mic delivers satisfying performance. Your voice won’t be perfectly clear on the other end but it will be intelligible.

The headphones are bass-heavy. This will affect the midrange reproduction and it will muffle some low midrange frequencies. The highs are elevated but not too bright or painful. 

Things we don’t like

It’s expected at this price point but we still have to point out that everything is made of plastic. The headphones are not flimsy but we still don’t think they are made to last.

PowerLocus headphones don’t feature AM tuner (only FM). 

Comparison Table


13. Bluedio T2 Plus Turbine Wireless Bluetooth Headphones

Bluedio T2 Plus Turbine Wireless Bluetooth Headphones

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Bluedio T2+ headphones are, in many ways, very similar to the previous PowerLocus headphones. The biggest advantages of T2+, over the previously mentioned PowerLocus, are more unique design and much longer playtime. 

What’s in the box?

Inside the box, you’ll find your headphones, charging cable, 3.5mm audio cable, manual, and a warranty card. 

Things we like 

T2+ headphones have a surprisingly unique design with those turbine-inspired rotating cups. At first glance, the headphones look much more premium than they are. They are available in four colors – black, white, blue, and red. Once you take a closer look, you’ll realize why they are so cheap. They are mostly plastic with some aluminum details and with an aluminum headband frame. The earcup covers may look like they are made of aluminum but that’s all plastic.  There are some subtle brandings on the earcups and on the headband. 

One thing you should have in mind when it comes to comfort is that these are on-ear headphones (not over-ear). So, if you have very sensitive ears, you should probably avoid these. They don’t put any excessive pressure on the ears or on the head and the paddings are thick and plushy. So, other than on-ear design, we have no complaints.

The control scheme is somewhat unusual. The left cup houses only one AUX input. All the other controls and inputs are on the right cup. Around the earcup rim, you will see a mic hole, micro USB charging port, playback/volume dial, power/pairing/call button, micro SD card slot, MODE, and SCAN buttons. Getting used to these buttons is going to take some time. 

The headphones are very versatile. Besides the standard wired connection and Bluetooth, you can play the music from a micro SD card (which no one does) or you can listen to FM radio thanks to the built-in internal antenna. 

Bluetooth works as advertised. The headphones feature Bluetooth 4.1 with a 30ft range. The pairing is fast and the connection is stable within the advertised range. NFC and multipoint pairing are not supported. 

The built-in rechargeable battery will provide up to 30h of playback at 50% volume (less than 6 hours at full blast). The recharge takes less than 3 hours. If you run out of juice and you can’t charge the battery, you can use the headphones in wired mode, like a regular pair of headphones.

The FM reception is satisfying. You will be able to find at least 10 clean FM stations without any static noise wherever you are. You can search for stations manually or automatically. However, there’s no way to know which frequency you’re on and there are no radio presets. 

The mic offers below-average performance. It will muffle and distort your voice but it’s usable if you are in a quiet environment. 

The sound is bass-heavy. The bass often overpowers the midrange and makes some vocals (especially deep male vocals) less intelligible. If you are into bass-driven music, you may love this kind of sound but if you are into more balanced vocal-centric music, these are not the best choice. 

Things we don’t like

The cheap construction is not a surprise when you know that T2+ headphones are priced under $30. The most annoying part regarding the construction quality are the buttons. They are clunky and they rattle when you move your head too much.  

Another thing we want to warn you about is the sound leakage. They are closed-back headphones but there are some apertures on the earcup covers. The leakage is noticeable even at moderate volumes. 

Comparison Table


14. NIA Q8 Wireless Bluetooth Headphones with FM tuner

NIA Q8 Wireless Bluetooth Headphones with FM tuner

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NIA is another generic brand. You can also find these headphones under the name GranVela. In case you have a large head, you can skip this review. Q8 headphones are kind of smallish on-ear headphones. They are a good choice for your kid and for people with smaller heads. The greatest highlight is connection versatility. The biggest downside is poor build quality.

What’s in the box?

Inside the box, you’ll find your NIA Q8 headphones, charging cable, 3.5mm audio cable, manual, and a warranty card. 

Things we like 

The headphones feature simple but visually appealing design with plastic cups and aluminum yokes connecting the cups with the headband. Unlike Bluedio T2+, NIA Q8 headphones look kind of cheap. Both the headband and the cups are quite small. The headphones are foldable which makes transportation easier. 

As long as you don’t have a really large head and you don’t mind on-ear design, you will be happy with the amount of comfort these headphones provide. The paddings are soft and comfy, the headband is adjustable, and the clamping force is optimal. The headphones are also very light. 

The control scheme is relatively simple but all the buttons are multifunctional and everything is located on the right cup (all the inputs and all the buttons). The call button is located on the earcup cover. It’s used to answer calls in Bluetooth mode, to change EQ settings in micro SD card mode or to scan for stations in FM mode. The volume knob/switch can also be used to change stations in FM mode or to control the playback (in Bluetooth, micro SD card, and AUX modes). The right cup also houses all the inputs (3.5mm, micro USB charging port, micro SD card slot). 

You can use the headphones in wireless (Bluetooth, FM, micro SD) or wired mode (AUX). The battery is not required in wired mode. 

The headphones feature Bluetooth 4.2 with a standard 30ft range. The pairing is simple and fast. 

The thing that surprised us the most was the NIA Connect app (available for Android and iOS devices). The app allows you to play with different EQ settings, see FM station frequencies and select the station you want to listen, and to check the battery status. It’s a simple but very useful app. 

The battery offers satisfying performance considering the price. You will get up to 10 hours of playtime at 50% volume and the recharge takes less than 3h.

FM reception is not impressive. Some of the stations had noticeable static noise but the majority was perfectly clean. 

To answer calls in Bluetooth mode, you can simply press the call button on the right cup. The mic is usable but far from great. 

The sound quality is acceptable. The emphasis is on the bass which overpowers the mids at high volumes and causes noticeable distortion. The volume limit is set at 93dB in Bluetooth mode (it’s not limited in wired mode). 

Things we don’t like

The build quality is quite poor which is completely expected and acceptable at this price point but we still have the responsibility to inform you. 

Also, you can answer calls only in Bluetooth mode. There’s no way to answer calls in other modes. 

Comparison Table


15. ELEGIANT Bluetooth Headphones with Digital FM Tuner

ELEGIANT Bluetooth Headphones with Digital FM Tuner

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ELEGIANT is another cheap generic headphone model. Like many other cheap headphones, ELEGIANT is a mixture of good and bad. On the good side, you have great versatility (Bluetooth, FM, micro SD, and AUX) and stylish design. On the bad side, the headphones are really tight and the button arrangement is awkward. For the price (which is quite affordable), they offer more than satisfying performance.

What’s in the box?

The headphones come with a charging cable, 3.5mm audio cable, user manual, and a warranty card.

Things we like 

In terms of design, ELEGIANT headphones are much more stylish than the previously mentioned NIA headphones. The manufacturer went for a simple and elegant look with the ELEGIANT logo on the left cup and a small LCD screen on the right cup.

The build quality is pretty much on par with the price. You won’t see any metal parts. Even the headband frame and hinges are made of plastic. Still, we can’t complain much at this price point. 

As said previously, there are four available modes – Bluetooth, FM, micro SD, and AUX. 

Bluetooth connection is the most convenient connection type and it works as advertised. The headphones feature Bluetooth 4.0 with a 30ft range. Advanced features like NFC and multipoint pairing are not available. 

The built-in battery will deliver 7-8 hours of playtime at moderate volumes (2-3 hours at full blast). The recharge takes 2 hours.

FM reception is not great. They are not as good as all those headphones with external antennas we’ve talked about earlier. You will get no more than 10 clear stations, without any hissing. You won’t be able to select the presets. 

When you run out of juice, you can use the included AUX cable and connect the headphones to your phone. 

The built-in mic delivers below-average performance. It’s usable in quiet environments but, if there’s too much noise or wind, it’s almost impossible to use it.

The sound is bassy with relatively clear mids and bright treble. As expected, everything gets pretty distorted at high volumes.

Things we don’t like

The all-plastic build is completely expected but we still have to emphasize that they are fragile. 

The comfort is quite problematic. People with large heads should avoid them. They are quite tight and the earpads are pretty stiff. You should also be aware that these are on-ear headphones. So, if you have sensitive ears, you won’t be happy. They can be a good choice for kids and people with smaller heads.  

The controls are not very intuitive and you will need some time to adjust and learn. Everything is located on the right cup. All the buttons are multifunctional and, depending on how long you press them, they will do different things. You might even need to go through the manual to learn how to activate different modes. 

Comparison Table


This is the end of our list of 15 best AM/FM radio headphones, but don’t go away, yet. We have prepared a small guide with a few tips on what to look for when buying AM/FM radio headphones.

Things to Look for When Buying AM/FM Radio Headphones

Build quality and comfort

Well, to be honest, most of the AM/FM headphones on this list are priced under $100 and, at this price point, you can’t expect them to be incredibly rugged and durable. However, most of the noise reduction radio headphones are much more durable than the regular wired or wireless headphones. After all, they are designed to be used in specific conditions and they are supposed to withstand a few kicks. 

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Comfort is always a tricky thing because there are so many factors that affect it. In general, you can expect those noise reduction headphones to be tighter than average (that’s one of the ways to attenuate the noise). None of these headphones will win the best comfort award but most of them won’t cause extreme pain or discomfort.

Noise Reduction Rating (NRR)

NRR describes the potential of a certain headphone/earmuff model to attenuate the ambient noise. It’s not a secret what to look for – higher NRR means better isolation and better protection. The highest NRR when it comes to headphones is 30. 

Versatility – Number of connections

This one is also pretty simple – you should look for more connections. Some AM/FM radio headphones are designed for radio listening only and don’t have any inputs, but most of them have at least a standard 3.5mm audio input. Some even feature Bluetooth connectivity or a micro SD card slot. 

AM/FM reception 

The quality of reception depends on the quality of internal parts but also on your location. Some places simply have better AM and FM coverage than others. Also, too many radio signals can cause some serious interference, which makes fine-tuning very hard. Generally speaking, the headphones with external antennas offer better radio performance than those with internal antennas. That’s the only thing we can say with certainty. 

Controls 

Having the most important controls like the volume and tuning dials/buttons at your fingertips is always desirable and makes the usage more convenient. That’s what you should look for. 

Sound quality 

We all have different tastes when it comes to sound quality. Some people like it bassy, while others like more balanced sound with better vocal clarity. When it comes to AM/FM radio headphones, especially noise reduction (or hearing protection) headphones, we can say one thing with certainty – they are not made for audiophiles. Most of these headphones are cheap and their primary purpose is to protect your hearing. All the other features are a bonus. Most of the noise reduction radio headphones have a relatively flat bass response with a slightly emphasized mids and with a subtle roll-off in the high-end after 10kHz. On the other hand, some of those regular Bluetooth headphones with built-in FM tuners are quite bassy. 

Price

Unless you want those Sony radio headphones that are made for radio listening only, you don’t have to pay more than $100. Even Sony radio headphones are not, in any way, worth that kind of money, but they are considered collectors’ items (because they are all discontinued by the manufacturer), and that’s what makes them so pricey. You will get more than satisfying performance for 80 bucks or less. The most reputable brands when it comes to noise reduction AM/FM radio headphones are 3M Worktunes, Honeywell, and Stanley, but there are also a few very good generic brands priced under $50.  


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